sci fi

wtf book covers cover art sci fi books racist - 6874684928
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There isn't one part of this cover, not even the title, that doesn't make me uncomfortable.

reviews fantasy hansel and gretel witch hunters john dies at the end movies gemma arterton Jeremy renner sci fi grande gatto - 7004411136
By Unknown
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John Dies at the End may not be all I was hoping for, but it's still a fun enough movie, especially if you go see it with the right mindset. Hansel and Gretel on the other hand... just don't.

Will you see either of these movies this weekend? Be sure to tell us what you think.

book covers books cover art robot sci fi science fiction woman wtf - 6511029504
By Unknown
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Don't you hate it when you meet a beautiful naked woman and not only does she turn out to be a robot, but she starts phasing through the floor? No wonder that guy's depressed.

By Unknown
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Little known fact, The Thing enjoyed a successful career as a lounge musician after the events in Antarctica.

(Warning: contains disturbing images from the 1982 film "The Thing," and some salty language.)

Amanda Seyfried cinema harlan ellison In Time Justin Timberlake movies review sci fi - 5368792320
By Unknown
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It's not a great movie, but the premise was enough to keep me entertained. I'd certainly watch this over the "Thing" prequel. In the end though, all it really did for was make me want to reread the Ellison story.

alphabet art challenge films guess sci fi stephen wildish - 5967430400
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Stephen Wildish made another "Film Alphabet" challenge. This time it's all Sci-Fi movies. Can you guess them all?

By Unknown
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"Lock-Out" is an upcoming sci-fi thriller produced by Luc Besson about an outer space prison taken over by inmates.

Content warning: Strong language is spoken and subtitled at 1:43.

authors books guy fawkes day letter ray bradbury sci fi symbolism writing - 5526703616
Via io9
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In 1964, a 16-year-old Bruce McAllister wrote to 150 authors asking about the symbolism in their work. A number of authors wrote back, including Ray Bradbury.